Art

#animals #metal #sculpture #steel

Complex Networks of Metallic Branches Shape Animal Sculptures by Kang Dong Hyun

January 6, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Forest of Coexistence” (2019), stainless steel and urethane paint, 300 x 160 x 120 centimeters. All images © Kang Dong Hyun, shared with permission

What eventually becomes a stately stag or majestically posed lion in Kang Dong Hyun’s Forest of Coexistence starts with countless metallic branches that splay in every direction. The Korean artist (previously) welds spindly shoots and sprawling root-like shapes into facial features and bodies that are then finished with urethane paint. Creating a cohesive display of flora and fauna, each hollow, stainless steel sculpture considers the relationship between species and the idea that “all life on Earth may lead to an invisible string,” Kang says. For more of the artist’s intricately formed animals, visit Instagram.

 

“Forest of Coexistence” (2020), stainless steel and urethane paint, 73 x 46 x 11 centimeters

“Forest of Coexistence” (2021), stainless steel and urethane paint, 150 x 120 x 50 centimeters

“Forest of Coexistence” (2021), stainless steel and urethane paint, 64 x 36 x 114 centimeters

“Forest of Coexistence” (2021), stainless steel and urethane paint, 68 x 80 x 20 centimeters

“Forest of Coexistence” (2018), stainless steel and urethane paint, 130 x 45 x 85 centimeters

“Forest of Coexistence” (2020), stainless steel and urethane paint, 51 x 80 x 39 centimeters

#animals #metal #sculpture #steel

 

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