Design

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Art Design Food

Wine Streams Through Sea Creatures in Playful Glass Decanters by Charlie Matz

December 22, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Charlie Matz, shared with permission

In the sleek decanters designed by artist Charlie Matz, wine and other spirits trickle through a crab’s claws, a shark’s open jaws, and the belly of a branzino. The playful aeration vessels are handmade with borosilicate glass and position marine life at the necks of the carafe, ensuring that the creatures flush with reds and pinks with every pour. Matz, who works at the Chicago-based Ignite Glass, has a few of the decanters available in the studio’s shop, and you can follow his functional creations and new releases on Instagram.

 

 

 



Craft Design

Laser-Cut Paper Forms Tessellating Patterns in Ibbini Studio's Ornate Sculptures

December 21, 2021

Anna Marks

All images © Ibbini Studio, shared with permission

Ibbini Studio (previously) creates intricate paper sculptures meticulously crafted to appear as though they have been made in nature. Artist Julia Ibbini and computer scientist Stephane Noyer, who are behind the Abu Dhabi-based studio, spent the last year working on a collection of geometric cylindrical pieces swirling with vine-like forms, mirrored geometric designs that resemble the repeating patterns in honeycomb, and sculptures that look like delicate shells.

The duo began collaborating in 2017 and now creates pieces by hand and machine, using a painstaking process that combines analog and digital techniques. “My practice focuses a great deal on exploring the boundaries of what is possible with the materials and techniques used,” Ibbini tells Colossal. “In 2021, there was a significant jump in the complexity and technology we were working with, and I think the pieces produced over this period very much reflect that.”

Ibbini Studio’s sculptures are the product of algorithmically defined patterns that replicate throughout each work. Drawing inspiration from organic structures, they use parametric design software to render a three-dimensional form and refine the final shape. A laser then cuts each paper or card, which are glued together by hand to create the resulting piece.

“In the last couple of months, we have been working with detailed sculptural forms in woods (and the complex engineering required to create them), which I anticipate will result in a finished series in 2022,” they say. Follow their progress and keep an eye out for upcoming exhibitions on Instagram.

 

 

 



Craft Design

Exquisite Hairpieces by Sakae Recreate Flowers and Butterflies with Resin and Wire

December 20, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy of Sakae

From liquid resin and thin strips of wire, Tokyo-based designer Sakae (previously) crafts delicate hairpieces known as kanzashi. The ornamental forms are often worn for special occasions and are realistic in shape and texture, with lustrous petals and wings in translucent shades that catch surrounding light. You can see more of Sakae’s hydrangeas, irises, and daffodils on Flickr and her site, and she auctions her pieces for buyers in Japan. Follow news about international releases on Facebook.

 

 

 



Design

Pyrotechnic Posters Ignite a Spectacular Performance of Fire, Flares, and Sparks

December 9, 2021

Grace Ebert

With their most recent project Affiches Artifices, French designers Marion Pinaffo and Raphaël Pluvinage might have sparked a new poster trend with a little extra flare. The duo created a dozen geometric motifs that, at first glance, appear as simple glittering arches and circular patterns. Once ignited by a match, though, the forms light up in a spectacular blend of incandescent bursts and multi-color flames.

To produce the controlled burns, Pinaffo and Pluvinage coated fire-resistant paper with distinct markings that when lit on one end, create a clear path for the flame to follow, and although the posters are left charred, the original design remains. “As ‘pyrotechnic ink’ doesn’t exist as such, we spend a lot of time in our workshop looking for the right way of mixing and printing such chemicals. After hundreds of failed attempts, we finally found the right way,” the duo told Creative Boom. “The visuals and sound effects are physically programmed on paper directly, depending on the length and path of gunpowder.”

Watch the short video below to see the incendiary creations in action, and explore more from Pinaffo and Pulvinage on Instagram.

 

 

 



Design

A Chunky Bronze Logo Wraps Around the Corner of a Prague Art Museum

December 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images by Vojtěch Veškrna, Kunsthalle Praha

A column of metallic type scales the former Zenger Transformer Substation in Prague, melding the historic venue with the visual identity of the new art institution housed in its space. Conceived by the Czech Republic-based Studio Najbrt, the uniquely positioned logo wraps vertically around the corner of the Kunsthalle Praha building and is based on a typeface by German designer Jan Tschichold, who created it in the 1930s around the time the station was built. Construction involved modeling the hinged letters in paper and modifying the forms to account for the central bend, a lengthy process you can see more of Studio Najbrt’s Instagram.

 

 

 



Design

At the Forefront of Sustainable Fashion, Peterson Stoop Reconstructs Tattered Sneakers into New Patchwork Designs

December 1, 2021

Grace Ebert

All images © Peterson Stoop, shared with permission

Coinciding with the rise of repurposed fabrics and visible mending, the Amsterdam-based design studio Peterson Stoop is combating waste in one vector of the fashion industry. The company, which was founded by Jelske Peterson and Jarah Stoop in 2013, salvages worn shoes otherwise destined for landfills—it’s estimated that a single pair of trainers can take 1,000 years to break down—and repurposes them into mules, high-tops, and loafers. Combined with cork, leather, and other natural materials for support, the new shoes highlight the original logos and tattered fabrics through a patchwork of thick seams.

Stoop tells Colossal that the studio sources sneakers from sorting centers, secondhand shops, and retailers with overstock, although it gravitates toward brands like Nike, Adidas, and Converse because of their cultural relevance. “We deconstruct the shoes and rebuild them piece by piece. By re-designing them with traditional techniques, we create an interesting tension between two different worlds,” she says. “At the same time, we are creating a product that is repairable time and again.”

Now offering more than a dozen genderless styles, Peterson Stoop plans to expand its product line with a focus on the materials at hand. Gathering 20 pairs of blue Nike Blazers, for example, inspired a unique collection that maintains the integrity of the initial design with a new, repairable sole. “To see the same shoes worn differently with scuffs, marks, and different tints faded by the sun we documented it for ourselves. By framing so-called identical shoes in one shot, you realize how different, unique, and beautiful they all actually are,” Stoop says.

Peterson Stoop’s shop is stocked with original designs and is open for custom orders. See more of the company’s workspace and upcycling process on Instagram.